Jury Hits Samsung With $1 Billion In Damages For Infringing Apple’s Patents

By Joseph Mandour on August 24, 2012

Infringement LawAfter three days of deliberation the jury in Apple Inc.’s massive patent infringement suit against Samsung Electronics Co. reportedly found Friday that a vast range of Samsung’s portable electronic devices like smartphones and tablets infringed Apple’s patented technology, and awarded Apple $1 billion in compensation.

Apple, meanwhile, did not violate any of Samsung’s patents, the jury ruled, according to TheVerge.com, which reported the decision live from the courtroom.

Samsung’s Continuum, Droid Charge, Exhibit 4G, Galasy Ace, Prevail, S 4G, S II, Galaxy Tab, The Gem, Indulge, Infuse 4G, Mesmerie, Nexus S 4G, Replenish, Vibrant and other devices were found to have too many similarities to Apple’s software interfaces, like the “bounce-back” effect when scrolling between screens.

Samsung’s Fascinate, Galaxy S, S 4G, S 2 ATT, S2 i9100, S2 Tmobile, S 2 Epic 4G touch, Skyrocket, Showcase, Infuse 4G, Mesmerize, and Vibrant were all also found to infringe Apple’s trade dress.

The jury found Samsung guilty of willful infringement, and ruled Samsung is barred by patent exhaustion from enforcing two of its patents against Apple.

The verdict, which is certain to be appealed, caps a four week trial in the Northern District of California that was the most visible and significant battle of the two consumer electronics giants’ war over some of the most iconic designs of the twenty-first century, including those for the iPhone and iPad.

The jury’s verdict came on the heels of news earlier in the day that South Korea’s Seoul Central District Court had issued a mixed decision, finding each of the companies infringed some of the other’s patented technology and ordering each to stop selling a few models of smartphones and tablets in that country.

“Today’s verdict should not be viewed as a win for Apple, but as a loss for the American consumer,” Samsung said in a statement Friday. “It will lead to fewer choices, less innovation, and potentially higher prices. It is unfortunate that patent law can be manipulated to give one company a monopoly over rectangles with rounded corners, or technology that is being improved every day by Samsung and other companies.”

“Consumers have the right to choices, and they know what they are buying when they purchase Samsung products,” Samsung said. “This is not the final word in this case or in battles being waged in courts and tribunals around the world, some of which have already rejected many of Apple’s claims. Samsung will continue to innovate and offer choices for the consumer.”

Representatives for Apple did not respond to emails seeking comment.

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Posted in: Patent Infringement