Melrose Jewelers Accused Of Trademark Infringement By Rolex

By Joseph Mandour on August 13, 2012

watch-thumb-200x133-46827 San Diego – Rolex announced that it has recently initiated a trademark infringement lawsuit against Melrose Jewelers.

After purchasing multiple products from the Los Angeles jeweler, Rolex alleges that the defendant is offering counterfeit products that use the Rolex trademarks without authorization. In its court documents, Rolex claims that Melrose also intentionally created websites to promote, advertise and sell counterfeit watches and parts. Rolex also says that Melrose is using the registered Rolex trademarks to sell its counterfeit products in retail locations, in advertisements and on the Internet. The famous watchmaker claims that it is in no way affiliated with the jewelry store and use of its trademarks is causing consumer confusion and deception. Rolex alleges that Melrose’s actions constitute “false designations of origin, false descriptions and unfair competition”.

Melrose argues that it only acquires authentic timepieces and parts to sell on its websites and at its retail locations. The jewelry store insists that it only offers the highest quality products and offers up its $10 million revenue from 2011 as proof. Melrose offers other luxury brands for sale including Breitling, Cartier, Tag Heuer and Omega. The popular jeweler claims that it sells pre-owned timepieces and restores previously worn watches, but vehemently insists that it does not include counterfeit products or parts. It also claims that its jewelers conduct thorough inspections of products to ensure that only the best quality watches are offered to its consumers.

Rolex is also alleging that Melrose conducts business through six separate websites that utilize the Rolex trademarks and direct Rolex consumers to Melrose Jeweler websites. The websites include: rolexgiveaway.ca, rolexblogsite.com, rolexblogsite.net, rolexwatchforum.com, rolexwatchforum.net, rolexwatchforums.com, and rolexwatchforums.

Rolex is asking for a court order to prevent Melrose from using its trademarks. It is also seeking a permanent injunction to shut down the websites offering new or previously owned products under the Rolex brand names or utilizing meta tags or keywords incorporating the Rolex trademarks. The luxury watchmaker is seeking $2 million in damages, or up to $100,000 for each domain name Melrose has used. Rolex is also seeking attorney’s fees and court costs.

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