Twitter Updates Its Bird Logo Trademark

By Joseph Mandour on June 11, 2012

Patent Lawyer Los Angeles – Larry, the blue bird Twitter mascot, has gone on a diet. Twitter has recently unveiled a new look for its trademarked blue bird logo that has some obvious changes as well as some not so noticeable changes.

The San Francisco based social media company took to Twitter to announce the change. Twitter’s creative director Doug Bowman tweeted, “Our new bird grows out of love for ornithology, design within creative constraints, and simple geometry. This bird is crafted purely from three sets of overlapping circles – similar to how your networks, interests, and ideas connect and intersect with peers and friends. Whether soaring high above the earth to take in a broad view, or flocking with other birds to achieve a common purpose, a bird in flight is the ultimate representation of freedom, hope and limitless possibility.”

The main differences in Twitter’s logo appear to be the following: the new bird appears to be leaner, the tuft on the top of the birds head is no longer there, the new bird is looking up rather than straight ahead, the wing of the bird is facing upward rather than downward, and the color blue is a darker shade.

Twitter appears to be flying high above many other social media sites with its 140 million active users, and is on its way to soaring as high as its competitor Facebook. According to Reuters, Twitter is rumored to be the next best company for an IPO and may follow in Facebook’s footsteps. It is estimated that this year Twitter will reach $260 million in revenue.

Just as many consumers can immediately recognize popular logos such as the Nike swoosh, the golden arches of McDonald’s, and the Microsoft Windows logo, Twitter is assured that its blue bird logo will be among this list as one of the most recognizable icons. A tweet posted on Twitter mentioned this goal by saying “from now on, this bird will be the universally recognizable symbol of Twitter,” and “there’s no longer a need for text, bubbled typefaces, or a lowercase ‘t’ to represent Twitter.”

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